A Schott in the Dark – Soundtracks, Creole Style

Four pints into a pub discussion and there’s a reasonable chance the question, “Whatever happened to..?” will raise it’s head – 90% of the time, the answer is that they didn’t go anywhere, you did. Such is the case with Kid Creole, the debonair Cab Calloway of the 80’s whose omnipresence in both the charts and as the musical act in almost every programme on television with a slot…probably even a few that didn’t. So where did he go? He didn’t. Album after album, tour after tour, age has not wearied him and he could still out-dance and out-cool bands 1/4 of his age. His longevity has come from a burning desire to challenge the status quo, to entertain people of all ages and on the odd occasion, completely reinvent himself. Schott Treatment sees Kid generously giving the spotlight to his long-time musical partner, Peter Schott, keyboardist with the Coconuts for many years. Inevitably, it’s not what you expect –  four tracks of ultra-lounge pop-jazz with a heavy influence of film soundtracks from years past – everything from 40s noir to Bond-esque lushness. Released on Kid’s own label, 2C2C, the good man and Peter have selected some of the soundtracks which have left a lasting effect on them over the years.

Kid Creole:

THE GLASS MOUNTAIN (1949)

music by Nino Rota

Nino Rota’s score ‘upstages’ the film itself. The movie is memorable primarily because of the incredibly dramatic score.

A familiar tale of infidelity could not ask for better unfamiliar chords and melodies. Oh, and Valentina Cortese is the other memorable thing about this movie for me.  Even Nino Rota could not steal her thunder!

SAMSON AND DELILAH (1949)

music by Victor Young

My absolute favorite romantic score ever. Victor Young’s lush arrangements are a perfect compliment to Victor Mature and Hedy Lamarr’s love scenes. I love everything about this film but it would be far less remarkable without the music. I bought the soundtrack album when I was 10 years old! I played it so much it disappeared. Victor Young and Cecil B. DeMille – a match made in heaven.

MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY (1962)

music by Bronisław Kaper

My favorite version of this epic tale stars Marlon Brandon and Trevor Howard and Tarita. The music is as breathtaking as the cinematography. The score in the Tahitian scenes is the most influential motion picture music in my songwriting career. Once again, I cannot imagine this movie without these passionate melodies. The marriage of image and music is sheer perfection. Interestingly enough, Brando went on to marry the Tahitian goddess, Tarita. I am sure the music had something to do with that decision!

CAPE FEAR (1962)

music by Bernard Herrmann

Scary melodies from the master of psycho-drama music! Robert Mitchum scared the shit out of me when I first saw this movie. The music helped to create glorious nightmares for me for weeks after viewing this classic. Bernard Hermann is the only composer I know who can turn innocent flutes and mellow cellos into devil’s instruments! A true genius.

THE CIDER HOUSE RULES (1999)

music by Rachel Portman

I’m sorry but I’m a sucker for romantic music. And this is some of the best. Nominated for the Best Original Score! It should have won. It’s delicious. Perfect music for perfect casting – Charlize Theron and Toby Maguire. The main theme, alone, will make you fall in love with love.

THE NOTEBOOK (2004)

music by Aaron Zigman

It doesn’t get better than this for romantic, kill-me-now movie scores! Melancholy melodies that make you weep and at the same time make you thank the gods that you’re alive! Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. Indeed. I dare anyone to listen to this score and not immediately rush down the street in the pouring rain and kiss the nearest good-looking stranger!

Peter Schott (allowing the music to speak for itself!)

VERTIGO – Bernard Herrmann

THUNDERBALL – John Barry

YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE – John Barry

THE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN – Alex North

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA – Maurice Jarre

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S – Henry Mancini

more recent:

ROAD TO PERDITION – Thomas Newman

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN – John Williams  

GLADIATOR – Hans Zimmer

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